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Tilapia is the common name for nearly a hundred species of cichlid fish from the tilapiine cichlid tribe. Tilapia are mainly freshwater fish inhabiting shallow streams, ponds, rivers and lakes and less commonly found living in brackish water. Historically, they have been of major importance in artisan fishing in Africa and the Levant and are of increasing importance in aquaculture and aquaponics. Tilapia can become problematic invasive species in new warm-water habitats such as Australia, whether deliberately or accidentally introduced, but generally not in temperate climates due to their inability to survive in cooler waters below about 70 °F.

As food

The firm texture and mild flavor of tilapia make it ideal for a variety of cooking methods. Pan-fried, broiled, baked, or braised, tilapia readily absorbs the robust flavor of spicy marinades, creamy sauces, and subtle seasonings. Plus, a 6-ounce fillet only has about 125 calories and about 1 gram of fat.

Health Benefits of Tilapia

Tilapia have very low levels of mercury, as they are fast-growing, lean and short-lived, with a primarily vegetarian diet, so do not accumulate mercury found in prey. Tilapia are low in saturated fat, calories, carbohydrates and sodium, and are a good protein source. They also contain the micronutrients phosphorus, niacin, selenium, vitamin B12 and potassium.

The lower amounts of omega-3 and the higher ratios of omega-6 fats in US-farmed tilapia raised questions about the health benefits of consuming farmed tilapia fish.

Read More at Wikipedia.
Recipe for Tilapia see Here and Here.
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